Close This
eCommerce | Darrell Recommends' Tools, Services and Products

Category - eCommerce

The Top Obvious, Weirdly Cool Marketing Lies We’re All OK With

Weirdly Cool Marketing Lies In the good old days when I still watched normal TV, my brain got to the point where it could filter the ads out. Sure, my eyes were still on the screen, but the people begging me to buy gum or finance a car became just a casserole of colors and sounds that threw off the pacing of The Simpsons. But after college, I spent a couple years watching Netflix or Hulu or YouTube, where you don’t see a lot of ads, and that skill atrophied. Then I went to visit my mother, and when we watched TV, I was unprepared to process … this. Somewhere along the lines, ad companies realized that they could get away with literally whatever they want. That’s why nobody complains when they tell us a bold-faced lie about … #5. How Much Your Monthly Bill Will Be Monthly bills are my enemy. And because they’re paid automatically, on my credit card, they’re a largely invisible enemy, like cholera or David Christopher Bell. So whenever I sign up for something that I’m going to pay for forever, like a new cellphone line or internet service or monthly deliveries of fresh buffalo meat, READ MORE…

Hedge Funds Launch New Lobbying Effort To Protect Their Power

WASHINGTON — Billionaire activist investors are joining forces to raid Congress for more power. According to a Wall Street Journal report, hedge fund operators Paul Singer, Carl Icahn, Bill Ackman, Barry Rosenstein and Dan Loeb formed a lobbying trade group called the Council for Investor Rights and Corporate Accountability, or CIRCA. The new group will push back against recent efforts to reform rules allowing activist shareholders, like the group’s founders, to raid companies to maximize shareholder profit, often at the expense of workers’ jobs. It comes at the same time hedge funds are waging under-the-radar lobbying battles on issues in which they have investments, like Puerto Rican debt and Fannie Mae, to increase their profits. Activist investors like Icahn, Ackman and Loeb are known for using their funds to invest in companies that they believe could be producing more value for shareholders. They use those investments to secure board seats and then press for changes that often include merging with competitors, selling off parts of the company, pushing up the price of drugs, moving production overseas and, in many cases, firing large numbers of workers. The policy fight they enter with their new lobbying muscle is one over who will READ MORE…

Inventor of World Wide Web wants it to change | Fox News

Cables are pictured on the Internet server at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Ecublens, near Lausanne May 9, 2011. (REUTERS/Denis Balibouse ) Technology leaders are meeting in San Francisco this week to discuss making the Internet a more decentralized, secure, and less censored place, with an emphasis on privacy and preserving history. The event, called the Decentralized Web Summit, is focused on locking the web open. The idea is that the Web could be a place where governments dont spy or censor information, where culture is preserved, and information is stored in a decentralized way. Related: ISIS taps tech for Web radio The Decentralized Web aims to make the Web open, secure and free of censorship by distributing data, processing, and hosting across millions of computers around the world, with no centralized control, the summits website declares. Among the speakers at the summit is Tim Berners-Lee, the 1989 creator of the World Wide Web. He spoke about its current shortcomings with The New York Times. It controls what people see, creates mechanisms for how people interact, Berners-Lee said. Its been great, but spying, blocking sites, repurposing peoples content, taking you to the wrong websites that completely undermines the READ MORE…

Sip Through Time With 130 Years Of Vibrant Coca-Cola Ads

If there’s something we can all consider a constant in American culture at least for the past 120 yearsit’s the ever-popular soda, Coca-Cola. The sweet, caffeinated, and bubbly beverage has been a staple of ball games, lunches, and quick pick-me-ups for decades. The soda first hit the market in 1886 and was originally intended to be a medicine and included coca leaves. But people liked the taste so much that carbonated water was added, making it a hugely popular soft drink with people of all ages. Today, the company is massive and Coke products can be found worldwide. And although there are no longer coca leaves in the mix,the formula for the iconic beverage remains, to this day, a company secret. Because it’s enjoyed such a long and rich history, many people feel a nostalgic pull towards Coca-Cola. It’s yielded some amazing DIY projects for people who love the brand, too, like this homemade Coca-Cola bar made from a vintage television. After all, it’s been a staple since before any of us were born! This year, Coca-Cola turns 130, so we’re taking a look back at some of their most beautiful and historical ads. They’re really little works of art READ MORE…

How This Woman’s ‘Story’ Could Single-Handedly Change Retail

“Yes, You Can Make It In Fashion” is a HuffPost Style series that profiles men and women across every area of the fashion industry and explores how they rose to the top, how they thrive and their practical advice for young people trying to break into their world. “Enough of this ‘someday’ shit.” That’s the line that prompted Rachel Shechtman to finally launch her own business back in 2011. Now, Shechtman is the proud CEO of Story, a 2,000 square-foot retail space in Manhattan that has the point of view of a magazine, changes inventory and themes like a gallery, and sells product like a store. Every four to eight weeks, Story partners with a brand to launch a new “story,” focused on different themes. Companies and brands pay upwards of $400,000 to work with Shechtman and re-create her Chelsea retail space, depending on their end goal. Whether they want to increase influencer engagement or PR or use the space for research and development, Story acts as an incubator to test and play with different tactics before companies potentially roll them out to scale. In April they launched a “Have Fun” story with Pepsi, which features everything from an in-store temporary READ MORE…

Why Your Fancy Banking App Isn’t Helping You Budget Better

One of the promises of online banking is that you can get an app to do your budgeting for you. It’s something that feels necessary in a post-Great Recession world: Real household incomes have been falling over the last decade and a half, and people have to keep track of their money because they have less to spend than they once did. The idea is that by tracking your spending, you can avoid the kind of profligacy that leads to budget downfall. Unfortunately for most Americans, budgeting isn’t really the problem. Keeping track of every happy hour drink may help on the margins, but for most people, financial problems are caused by things like losing a job or getting sick. The real problem is not that you aren’t budgeting — it’s that the costs of housing, college and health care have skyrocketed in the last 50 years. No app can keep you from overspending on rent, needing to pay back student loans or medical debt, or suffering through bouts of unemployment. That hasn’t stopped banks from trying. Ally Bank’s new app, Splurge Alert, is sort of like a reverse-Yelp. It uses geolocation to alert people when they’re approaching stores and READ MORE…

Philip Kives, K-tel founder and ‘wait there’s more’ infomercial king, dies at 87

Tireless Canadian-born TV pitchman made millions from marketing company selling everything from kitchen gadgets to compilation albums Philip Kives, the tireless TV pitchman whose commercials implored viewers to wait, theres more! while selling everything from vegetable slicers to hit music compilations on vinyl, has died at age 87. Samantha Kives said Thursday that her father died a day earlier after being hospitalized with an undisclosed illness. Kives became wealthy after founding marketing company K-tel International, which sold Miracle Brush hair removers, Veg-o-matic vegetable slicers and compilation albums with such titles as Goofy Greats among numerous other products. Kives started K-tel in the 1960s, and according to a biographical sketch on his website, his biggest selling product was the Miracle Brush, which sold 28 million in the late 1960s. More products would follow, including the Pocket Fisherman, a hamburger patty stacker, and the mood ring. The TV commercials sometimes included the hook line: But wait, theres more! For a generation of teenagers in the 1960s and 1970s, Kives legacy was a long list of compilation albums with hit songs that were sometimes edited down to fit 20 or more cuts on two sides of vinyl. A glam-pop song by The Bay READ MORE…

Academy to sue marketing firm over ‘Oscars goody bags’

Distinctive Assets alleged to have taken no steps to prevent false implications that much-publicised gift bags are officially affiliated to Academy The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is taking legal action over the way a set of unofficial Oscars gift bags have been marketed. The Academy claims that the marketing firm Distinctive Assetshas misrepresented their own goodie bags to make them seem officially affiliated with the awards ceremony, which takes place later this month, when in fact they are entirely unrelated. On Tuesday, the Academy filed a lawsuit against the marketing company, which specialises in product promotion through celebrity placement. The film organisation claims that Distinctive Assets has intentionally misled media outlets and the public as to their relation to the Oscars. Slogans such as Everyone Wins at the Oscars! Nominee Gift Bags are being used as evidence of copyright infringement. The Academys lawsuit says: Deeply concerned about the confusion Distinctive Assets was spreading, the Academys legal counsel wrote Distinctive Assets on or about February 17, 2015, to inform it that it is critical that no one be confused into believing that your gift bags are associated with or have any connection with the Academy. The $200,000 (140,000) READ MORE…

The IMF could have called their latest report ‘The New Normal: Yep, it Still Sucks’ | Greg Jericho

The latest world economic report is our half yearly reminder about disappointingly slow growth and downgraded projections On Wednesday the IMF released its latest 6 monthly world economic report, which is basically its half yearly reminder that things arent as good now as they thought they would be. The IMF has downgraded economic growth in 2016 and 2017 for the world, advanced nations, and for Australia. However amid the gloom the IMF sees Australias employment holding up well and it continues its long standing recommendation that governments make use of the low interest rates and invest in infrastructure to help boost growth. This time last year the IMF was doing its best to find some positives. Its world economic report was titled Uneven Growth: Short- and Long-Term Factors which, if not overflowing in optimism, was at least better than the one in October 2014 Legacies, Clouds, Uncertainties. The pessimism, however, has returned with the IMF barely being able to contain its disappointment, titling the latest report Too Slow for Too Long. I guess its more upbeat than calling it The New Normal: Yep, it Still Sucks. And the downgrades reflected the continued ability for the world economy to keep growing READ MORE…

Some people think the minimum wage should be $15. Let’s see how it stacks up to the current minimum.

  The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. That’s about $15,080 per year (before taxes). Image via Fight for $15. A lot of people think we should raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. That’s about $31,200 per year (also before taxes). How big of a deal is that extra $7.75 an hour? Let’s see. We’ll start with the monthly costs of just a few basic living expenses. And to keep things simple, we’ll focus on the average costs for a single person. BIG DISCLAIMER: Everyone’s experience is different. These are crudely assembled hypothetical scenarios to help us simply consider the relative impact of a $15 minimum wage. FOOD: The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the food costs for a single man are $188 to $373 per month. The range for single women is $167 to $331 per month. Since I’m a guy, I’ll just use that figure. (No offense, ladies.) And let’s assume some serious penny-pinching here by going with the low end. HOUSING: There’s a general rule of thumb that affordable housing should be no more than one-third of a person’s income. That’s getting harder to achieve in an age of flat (or declining) incomes READ MORE…